Reserve Your Place at the Captain’s Table – February 27, 2020

Tickets now on sale. Sponsorships available.

You’re invited to an evening of unique culinary tastings and decadent desserts from more than 20 acclaimed chefs and restaurants, complemented by an assortment of fine spirits, live entertainment, auctions and more at the sixth annual Captain’s Table event on February 27, 2020, 6-9 PM, during the Progressive Insurance Atlantic City Boat Show at the Atlantic City Convention Center.

The Captain’s Table event is hosted by Let Us Eat Please, Inc. and the Community FoodBank of New Jersey Southern Branch to help raise awareness and financial support for the summer feeding program that provides groceries to local families whose children receive free or reduced-price meals during the school year. More than 25,000 children in Atlantic County meet the federal criteria. The summer feeding program serves nine school districts, providing 30 lbs. of groceries to each eligible family every two weeks.

“One in seven children in New Jersey face hunger every day,” noted Renate Taylor of the Community Food Bank, “and when they don’t have enough to eat their physical and mental development suffer.”

Some of the children who have benefited from the summer feeding program are giving back by creating items to be sold at the event with all proceeds being donated for the cause.

Tickets are $125 per person and are available online here.

“One of the great things about this event is that the price of the ticket also includes admission any time that day to the Boat Show that features luxury motor and sailing yachts, sport fishers, performance boats and watercrafts. We encourage everyone to come early to take advantage of all that is available while supporting a great cause,” said Ken Calemmo, President of Let Us Eat Please, Inc.

For more information, please contact Ken Calemmo at kcalemmo@cooperlevenson.com or Renate Taylor at rtaylor@cfbnj.org.

Cooper Levenson Holiday Cards Feature Student Artwork

Cooper Levenson Holiday Cards Feature Student Artwork

Firm Supports ‘Let Us Eat, Please’ in Lieu of Corporate Holiday Gifts

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. Dec. 02, 2019 — Four area schoolchildren will see their artwork professionally published in holiday cards sent by Cooper Levenson Attorneys at Law. The annual holiday art contest encourages students to engage in the arts, and underscores Cooper Levenson’s support of charities in the communities it serves. The cards will be sent to 4,000 clients and friends of the firm.

Winners were chosen from the hundreds of entries submitted:

  1. Kenya McReynolds, an eighth grader from the Egg Harbor City School District
  2. Jenna Vivadelli, a fifth grader from the Hammonton Public School District
  3. Joana Andujar, a fifth grader from the Pleasantville Public School District
  4. Maya Krijt, a seventh grader from the Evesham Township School District

Students receive a $50 gift card and a cupcake party for their classes. The students’ teachers also receive a $100 gift card to use for art supplies. Both students and teachers will be honored at upcoming Board of Education (BOE) meetings.

The holiday cards noted that, in lieu of corporate gifts, the Atlantic City office will contribute to “Let Us Eat, Please,” an organization which feeds hungry families in the region.

About ‘Let Us Eat, Please’

‘Let Us Eat, Please’ was created by the late James L. Cooper, founding partner of Cooper Levenson. Just after his 82nd birthday, he formed the organization after he learned from his daughter, a teacher, about the effects of hunger on the one in five children who regularly attend school hungry. Last summer, through this grassroots, volunteer-driven effort and area schools, 810 families and their 2,300 children received a 30 pound box of groceries every two weeks, at no cost.

Cooper Levenson is a full service law firm since 1957, with offices in New Jersey, Delaware, Florida, Nevada, and New York. For more information, visit www.cooperlevenson.com.

Sean Dalton to conduct School Bus Safety Programs for Local School Districts

Sean F. Dalton, Esq., of Cooper Levenson, will provide School Bus Safety presentations to school personnel in selected Atlantic and Burlington County School Districts this week and next.

NJSA 18A: 39-19.1a requires employers to administer a safety education program to school bus drivers and aides 2X a year. This seminar will provide training on the following mandated topics:

  • student management and discipline;
  • school bus accident and emergency procedures;
  • conducting school bus emergency exit drills;
  • loading and unloading procedures;
  • school bus stop loading zone safety;
  • inspecting the school vehicle for students left on board at the end of a route;
  • the use of a student’s education records, including the employee’s responsibility to ensure the privacy of the student and the student’s records;
  • working with police, suspicious activity training;
  • addressing needs of students with disabilities;
  • accident reporting.

This program is available to School Districts, Boards of Education, Transportation Companies and School Insurance funds.

Instructor: Sean F. Dalton, Esquire, Former Assistant Attorney General Former Gloucester County Prosecutor (2001-2017)
sdalton@cooperlevenson | Direct Dial: (609) 572-7452 |

Robert E. Salad Presents Southern New Jersey Development Council Award to Sam Pipitone, President of F&S Produce

At the SNJDC Achievement Awards Reception last Wednesday, October 2, Cooper Levenson President Robert E. Salad presented the Economic Impact Award to F&S Produce Inc. President Sam Pipitone in recognition of “their accomplishments in the agricultural business sector and significant investment in the purchase and retrofitting of the shuttered Progresso Soup facility in Vineland. This investment has engendered a renewed sense of optimism in the region while creating employment opportunities for residents and further strengthening South Jersey’s position as a nationally recognized site for food manufacturing.” For more information about F&S Produce’s achievements, please visit the link below. https://bit.ly/2nLfzB9

More event photos, courtesy of Stokes Creative Group, here.

Cooper Levenson Announces Holiday Card Art Contest 2019 Edition

Download printable flyer here: Holiday Card Contest 2019
Cooper Levenson is proud to announce a Holiday Card Art Contest, open to students in grades 1 – 8. The prizes are a $50 gift card to the winning student (to use however they like), and a $100 gift card to the winning student’s art teacher, to be used for art supplies, a class party, or however the teacher and class decide. The rules:
  1. One (1) entry per student.
  2. Artwork must be submitted at 8-1/2? wide x 5-1/2? tall (landscape), with student information on back.  (Name,grade, school teacher and teacher email and phone number)
  3. Students in grades 1 – 8 may enter
  4. Theme: Home For The Holidays
  5. Entries will not be returned and will become the property of Cooper Levenson
  6. Hand-drawn art only! Crayons, paints, markers or pen and ink.

Judging Criteria: Relevance to theme – Originality – Creativity – Use of color – Use of space

Submissions must be received BEFORE 5 p.m. on November 1, 2019. Deliver to:
Cooper Levenson, Attorneys at Law
Donna Vecere, Director of Marketing
1125 Atlantic Avenue
Atlantic City, NJ 08401
Questions? Call 609-572-7362 dvecere@cooperlevenson.com

St. Augustine Senior Partners with Cooper Levenson on Business Suit Drive

Atlantic City, N.J.– In an effort to give Atlantic County residents help in re-entering the workforce, St. Augustine Prep senior William Reynolds has started a gently-used business suit drive, along with the Atlantic County Sheriff’s Foundation and Cooper Levenson Attorneys at Law. The initiative is part of his Caritas Project, a student-driven effort to enrich the community through meaningful service.

“When you donate a suit, you’re not just giving a piece of clothing, you’re giving someone a chance to look in the mirror and feel good,” said Reynolds.

At the start of the project, Reynolds approached Cooper Levenson to enlist their help because of the firm’s extensive charitable work. The attorneys and staff came out in full force to support the effort.

“We are thrilled to be able to help William with this important project that gives so many people a second chance,” said Kenneth J. Calemmo, chief operating officer of Cooper Levenson. “Not only will the right clothes help with first impressions in a job interview but they could give the wearer the self-confidence needed to land the job.”

Reynolds is working with the Atlantic County Sheriff’s Foundation to distribute the attire to those in need, through the Atlantic County Recovery Court and Hope One.

Cooper Levenson is a full service law firm since 1957, with offices in New Jersey, Delaware, Florida, Nevada, and New York. For more information, visit www.cooperlevenson.com.

PHOTO CAPTION

Pictured (L to R) are Kenneth J. Calemmo, Chief Operating Officer, Cooper Levenson; St. Augustine student William Reynolds; and Cooper Levenson Partners Amy E. Rudley, Esquire and Randolph C. Lafferty, Esquire.

Yolanda Melville Elected National President of NAACP NextGen

ATLANTIC CITY — Yolanda Melville, Esquire, the Legal Redress Officer for the Atlantic City NAACP Branch and National NAACP Legal Committee member, was elected national president of the NAACP’s Next Generation Alumni Leadership Council.

Melville, an attorney at Cooper Levenson in Atlantic City, was selected at the recent NAACP national convention in Detroit this summer. Melville was a member of the inaugural NAACP NextGen Young Professional Leadership Program comprised of 68 leaders ages 21 through 35, from 29 states.

The NextGen Leadership Program is designed to train and develop future leaders to serve the NAACP.

READ: Ashley Bennett, Samantha Whitfield Among 2019 NAACP NextGen Class

“Yolanda is an intelligent, compassionate, and focused leader who uses her legal talents to strive for equality and justice for all people,” Kaleem Shabazz, president of the Atlantic City NAACP and a city council with Atlantic City.

“The Atlantic City Branch has realized what Yolanda’s peers from across the nation have come to learn.  Yolanda is a sure bet for a leader who is energetic and goal-oriented,” he added.

Melville will serve a two-year term as an elected officer.

READ: Yolanda Melville Establishes Roots, Activism in Atlantic City

Participants complete a rigorous training program, including classroom trainings, webinar trainings, case studies, group assignments and special projects on leadership fundamentals, political action, economic empowerment, criminal justice, environmental justice, health advocacy, budgeting, fundraising, technology and direct action.

The NAACP said that NextGen participants are civically engaged young professionals committed to equality and social justice.

SB 212 Makes Towing in CICs Easier

Let’s be honest, no one likes to have their car towed. It’s inconvenient and costly. However, it’s equally frustrating to a resident living in a common interest community (CIC) to fi nd another car parked in their assigned spot, or when a person uses a handicap space without a permit, or leaves their vehicle in a red zone hindering the necessary access emergency vehicles need. The 2019 Nevada Legislature understands and has responded by passing Senate Bill 212 making it easier for residential communities to have cars removed for parking illegally inside a CIC.

Most of us are aware that part of living in a CIC is the requirement that homeowners and guests abide by rules and restrictions intended to protect the “community” and preserve its aesthetics. Doing so helps owners maintain the property value in their communities. These rules, commonly
referred to as CC&Rs (covenants, conditions, and restrictions), restrict the usage and enjoyment of real property. A staple of all CC&Rs is parking guidelines – where you can park, where you can’t, and when your car will be towed.

Under Nevada law, there are two types of legal tows: consent and non-consent. Anytime a car is towed from a residential community without the owner’s permission it’s deemed to be a non-consent tow. To protect car owners, the law requires a CIC’s homeowners association (HOA) to give notice of the possible tow. The notice may be in the form of a vehicle sticker affi xed to the car advising the owner that it may be towed if, after 48 hours, the violation is not cured. However, more serious parking violations, which will be discussed in further detail below, could
subject a vehicle to being towed “immediately.”

Clink link to read full artlice – SB 212 Makes Towing in CICs Easier

 

Our Partner Russell Lichtenstein represents Levinson and Formica and argued the motion that resulted in their dismissal from the sex discrimination lawsuit against county prosecutor.

As seen in The Press of Atlantic City July 16, 2019 edition
by MICHELLE BRUNETTI POST Staff Writer

A judge on Friday dismissed Atlantic County Executive Dennis Levinson and Freeholder Frank Formica from the lawsuit alleging discrimination against women by County Prosecutor Damon Tyner.

“The reason I was put in, in the first place, is I went to a rally at a church in Pleasantville in support of Damon Tyner,” said Levinson on Monday. “Not about whether he was guilty or innocent (of the charges of discrimination), but in support of him as a human being and what he has given to the community.”

Levinson credited Tyner with successfully bringing murder and drug charges against Linwood doctor James Kauffman, in the 2012 death of his wife April Kauffman. The case had gone cold under previous prosecutors.

Kauffman killed himself in prison.

The suit, filed in January by former Assistant Prosecutor Diane Ruberton, former Lt. Heather McManus and current Assistant Prosecutor Donna Fetzer, alleges gender discrimination, retaliation and other illicit behavior by the prosecutor and others in his office.

The attorney representing Levinson and Formica said Monday that Cumberland County Superior Court Judge James R. Swift found no merit to any of the claims against his clients, and dismissed the case against them with prejudice. That means the plaintiffs can’t file an amended claim to bring them back in, he said.

The case was moved to Cumberland County in March.

“It appears the plaintiffs were trying to silence County Executive Levinson and Freeholder Formica from speaking out in support of the fine job Damon Tyner has done,” said Russell Lichtenstein, a partner at Cooper Levenson.

Lawyers for the women released a written statement via email Monday afternoon.

“We believe that Dennis Levinson and Frank Formica engaged in actions that were retaliatory and that failed to protect these three women from discrimination,” said Michelle Douglass and Philip Burnham, the lawyers for the women. “New Jersey law makes clear that these actions can be the basis of a legal claim of discrimination even if the retaliation comes after an employee is no longer at her job.”

Tyner, whose office did not respond to a request for comment Monday, released a statement about the suit at the time it was filed.

“It is apparent that the plaintiffs are living in an alternative universe,” the statement said. “The very same conduct they accuse me and the members of my administration of committing was actually carried out by them and others during their brief, ineffective period of leadership of the Atlantic County Prosecutor’s Office.”

Levinson called his inclusion in the sex discrimination case “preposterous,” pointing out that he and the county have no say over who is appointed prosecutor, or how the office is run.

“As their lawyers should know … he is appointed by the governor,” Levinson said, and the prosecutor’s office operates independently.

Formica was named in the suit, according to Levinson, because his brother, Mario Formica, worked for the Prosecutor’s Office.

County Counsel Jim Ferguson estimated the inclusion of Levinson and Formica has already cost county taxpayers at least $20,000 in legal bills and expenses related to the case.

And the expenses will continue, Ferguson said, because the county itself is still named in the lawsuit.

“It’s an outrage. We don’t appoint, direct or hire anybody for that office,” Levinson said. “All we do is pay for it.”

He said the lawsuit will stretch out for quite some time, and cost the county taxpayers plenty.

“It is what it is. We have to live with it,” Levinson said.

The women allege in the suit that Tyner demoted high-ranking women while giving men raises, paid newly hired women at a lower rate than newly hired men, covered up complaints of gender discrimination and spoke in a derogatory fashion about women in general.

In addition to allegations of gender discrimination, the three women claim Tyner was involved in mortgage fraud, failed to investigate a claim that a police officer was leaking confidential information about the April Kauffman murder case and failed to tell defense counsel about the possible leak. They also accuse him of firing employees to hire his brother, and refusing to investigate after an assistant prosecutor exchanged advice via texts with a defendant in a pending domestic violence case.

Regarding Levinson and Formica, the lawsuit alleged they “refuse to look deeper at gender bias and systemically devalue plaintiffs, as women, in the workplace” and “have publicly announced their support of the male defendants even before this lawsuit was filed and even before all the facts were and/or have been disclosed.”

Contact: 609-272-7219 mpost@pressofac.com Twitter @MichelleBPost

Yolanda Melville among the graduates of the NAACP NextGen program to be recognized at 110th annual convention

BALTIMORE (July 11, 2019) The NAACP will recognize 68 Graduates from the inaugural 2018 NAACP Next Generation (NextGen) Young Professional Leadership Program during a graduation ceremony and reception at the NAACP 110th National Convention in Detroit, MI on Tuesday, July 23, from 5:00 pm to 7:00. The graduation ceremony will feature the pronouncement of the 2018 NEXTGEN class, highlight the social justice work of the graduates, and award graduation certificates by NAACP National Leaders. Rev. Dr. William Barber, II, member of the NAACP National Board of Directors and architect of the Moral Monday’s Movement, will offer the keynote address to the graduating class.

NextGen is a 12-month leadership development training program for young adults between the ages of 21 and 35 to develop civil rights competencies and leadership skills necessary to be active and effective social justice advocates. The NextGen program features a series of webinar & classroom trainings, case studies, and group exercises. The NextGen curriculum encompasses leadership development, legislative action, unit administration, communications, fundraising, budgeting, intergenerational relations, ethics in leadership, advocacy, and program planning consistent with NAACP strategic plan: Game Changers for the 21st Century.

The inaugural class launched in January 2018 and concluded in December of the same year with a total of 68 graduates. The ceremony will also recognize six Scholars of Excellence, which are 2018 participants that will continue in 2019 to complete the curriculum.

NEXTGEN Graduates are actively involved in their local Branches as subscribing life members of the NAACP, elected officers and executive committee members.  They have recruited hundreds of new members, developed voter action plans for their local communities and have become actively engaged on a wide range of social justice issues. The 2018 graduating class includes NAACP leaders from 29 different states.

To learn more about the 2018 NEXTGEN Graduates, visit here: NEXTGEN Leaders.

Graduates of the NAACP NextGen Program to be Recognized at 110th Annual Convention