Is Your Vehicle At Risk Of Being Hacked? Some Say Yes

Imagine that you are driving down the street when suddenly you notice that you no longer have control over your own vehicle. You try to press the breaks but nothing happens. You try to pull over to the side of the road, but you are unable to turn the wheel. The only thing you can do is brace for impact as your car collides with another vehicle.

For some, this sounds more like a scene straight out of a Hollywood movie. Due to some new technology though that is being added to new models of vehicles, scenarios such as this may become real life tragedies. This could leave many people across the nation, including a majority of our Atlantic City readers, wondering if their vehicles really are as safe as they think they are.

The possible risk of an accident was called to the attention of automakers everywhere when two computer security advocates successfully hacked into the onboard systems of a Jeep Cherokee recently. Though no one was hurt in the experiment, the hackers’ ability to access the vehicle’s driving systems via its wireless connection highlights a risk that all automakers should be aware of and address soon.

Wireless Internet connections are starting to become a popular feature in many newer vehicles. Unfortunately, as this test shows, these connections leave vehicles vulnerable to hackers who may want to do more harm than good. Though the automaker of the vehicle used in the test did release a software update shortly after hearing about the successful hack, this is not the only automaker equipping its vehicles with wireless technology. This means many more vehicles could be at risk of hacks.

If automakers are aware of the threat but fail to put the right security features in place, then they leave themselves open to liability in future personal injury claims. This is important for both automakers and our New Jersey readers to remember as cyber attacks on vehicles may become a real problem in the decades to come.

Date Published: March 1, 2017


Written by: Cooper Levenson, P.A.

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